User Tools

Site Tools


Sidebar

Manufacturing Networks Wiki

Projects

projects:twins:start

Twins

The Twins project is part of the European EUREKA cluster program ITEA 2, that addresses co-design problems of product development consisting of integrated hard- and software development.

Research

Within the TWINS project, we approach the problem of designing complex high-tech systems as a control problem. More precisely, we propose to view the problem of designing the software controlling the global behavior of the machine as the problem of designing a controller which achieves certain control objectives. In addition, we propose to generate the control algorithm and the control software automatically from the formal model of the plant and of the requirements. The argument in favor of this approach is that it should considerably reduce the length of the developmental cycle of the product, as it facilitates reduction in the number of design-test-redesign loops.

We distinguish between the uncontrolled physical system (referred to as plant) and the control software. Our goal is to generate the control software such that if the generated control software is coupled with the physical system, the resulting entity exhibits the desired behavior. There are many ways to formulate what is meant by the desired behavior. One possibility is to state it as conditions on the input-output map. More precisely, the dynamic behavior of the machines is usually determined by two kinds of input signals: user input and machine control input. The former is essentially the input provided by the We distinguish between the uncontrolled physical system (referred to as plant) and the control software. Our goal is to generate the control software such that if the generated control software is coupled with the physical system, the resulting entity exhibits the desired behavior. There are many ways to formulate what is meant by the desired behavior. One possibility is to state it as conditions on the input-output map. More precisely, the dynamic behavior of the machines is usually determined by two kinds of input signals: user input and machine control input. The former is essentially the input provided by the user or external environment. The machine control inputs are the ones which can be used by the controller to change the behavior of the system. The desired behavior can be formulated as a relation describing what kind of output the machine is supposed to produce for a specific user input.

machine_abs_small.jpeg

With the point view explained above in mind, the main problem of software design for machines can be reformulated as follows.

Design as control problem. Assume that a model P of the plant is given and assume that a formal specifcation S of the requirements is given. Furthermore, assume that the requirements are formulated as properties which should be satisfied by user input/machine output pairs. The task is to generate a controller C such that the closed-loop system on Figure 3 satisfies the requirements S.

The problem formulated above indeed looks similar to a classical control problem. However, in the case of complex machines the inputs and the outputs can be both discrete and continuous. This calls for methods and techniques which can deal with control systems exhibiting both continuous and discrete behavior. Such methods and techniques exist and they are known under the name of control theory for discrete-event systems and hybrid systems.

(Controlled synthesis as design procedure). Notice that the problem formulation implies that the generated controller C should be correct by design. That is, if the mathematical model of the plant and of the requirements is accurate enough, then the controller will enforce the desired behavior of the system. This means that in contrast to the case when the controller is designed by hand, no testing and debugging of the controller is required. The only purpose of testing is to find out whether the plant model is realistic enough and whether the model of the requirements formalizes all the relevant features. The overall design procedure is then as follows.

1. Build a mathematical model P of the plant.

2. Build a mathematical model S of the requirements.

3. Generate a controller C which is correct by construction.

4. Test the closed-loop system (see figure).

5. If the test results indicate incorrect functionality, then there can be only two causes for this; either the model P of the plant is inadequate, or the model S of the requirements is inadequate. Improve the model of the plant or the model of the requirements and repeat the steps above again.

6. If the outcome of the tests is satisfactory, then the design is ready.

:twins:sup_picture_abs_small.jpg

The proposed approach also fits well into the more general paradigm of model-based engineering. The main idea of model-based engineering can be formulated as follows. Instead of making prototypes of the system, the engineers are expected to make mathematical models of the system behavior and to test/verify their design choices by analyzing the impact of the choices on the behavior of the models.

Staff

Postdoc

Students

  • Esmee Bertens (at Oce)
  • Jelte Leijenaar (at Neopost)

Selected publications

M. Petreczky, D.A. van Beek, J.E. Rooda. Supervisor for toner error-handling, SE Report 2008-11, Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2008.

E. Bertens, R. Fabel, M.Petreczky, D.A.van.Beek, J.E.Rooda. Supervisory control synthesis for exception handling in printers. In Proc. Philips Conference on Applications of Control Technology, 2009.

M. Petreczky, P. Collins, D.A. van Beek, J.H. van Schuppen, J.E. Rooda. A control problem for hybrid systems with discrete inputs and outputs. Accepted to European Control Conference 2008.

See also:

Note that we use and (partially) develop Chi and the Compositional Interchange Format (CIF) for supervisory control synthesis and simulation in the Twins project.

projects/twins/start.txt · Last modified: Tuesday, 28 April 2009 : 16:21:21 by vanbeek